The Barons of Mordington, Berwickshire

Edrington House, caput of the Barony of Mordington until 2004.

Part of a parish map of Berwickshire in 1845. The original parish of Mordington is highlighted in red and yellow; the part of the parish of Mordington that is not highlighted (the north-east section) is the original parish of Lamberton, which was joined with Mordington in 1650. The south-eastern boundary of the parish forms the English/Scottish border, marching with the 'Liberties of Berwick' i.e. Berwick-upon-Tweed. To the west is the parish of Foulden and to the north the parish of Ayton, both baronies. The dark wavy line at the bottom is the River Tweed. The yellow area is the original barony of Mordington; the yellow area to the South of the narrow neck is Nether Mordington, which comprised the Barony after 1634; the yellow area to the North is Over Mordington. The red area, now called Cawderstanes, is within the parish but has never formed part of the Barony, being originally the site of Edrington Castle (now a ruin). These lands of Edrington (now Cawderstanes) were held by the Lauders of Bass for hundreds of years but were subsequently, in 1632, incorporated into the Barony of Beill - but, I believe, subsequently dissolved from that barony, the caput of which was in Haddingtonshire. The 'kink' in the Southern parish boundary is caused by the River Whiteadder, which flows into the Tweed.

Note:

1. Peter de Mordington, who was succeeded by his son-in-law;
2. Sir Henry de Haliburton, in right of his wife, Agnes de Mordington (d. After 25 Nov 1323), who resigned the Barony (possibly in 1318) to Robert the Bruce who granted it to;
3. Thomas Randolph, 1st Earl of Moray and Regent of Scotland (d. 1332), who was succeeded by his son;
4. Thomas Randolph, 2nd Earl of Moray (k. 1332), dsp, who was succeeded by his brother;
5. John Randolph, 3rd Earl of Moray (k. 1346), dsp, who was succeeded by his brother-in-law;
6. Patrick, 9th Earl of Dunbar (d. 1368), in right of his wife, Agnes Randolph, who dsp, who was succeeded by his nephew or Sir Patrick Dunbar (d. 1356/7) in right of his wife, Isabella Randolph, who was succeeded by his son;
7. George Dunbar, 10th Earl of Dunbar (d. after 8th Sep 1422), who granted the barony in 1372 to his son-in-law;
8. Sir James Douglas of Dalkeith (d. 1420), who granted the barony to his second son;
9. William Douglas, who was succeeded by his elder brother:
10. Sir James Douglas of Dalkeith (d. before May 1441), who was succeeded by his son;
11. William Douglas of Morton and Whittingham, who resigned the barony in favour of his nephew;
12. James Douglas, 1st Earl of Morton (d. before 22nd October 1493), who was succeeded by his son;
13. James Douglas, 2nd Earl of Morton (d. before September 1515), who was succeeded by his son;
14. James Douglas, 3rd Earl of Morton (d. before 4th November 1550), who was succeeded by his son-in-law;
15. James Douglas, 4th Earl of Morton and Regent of Scotland (executed 2nd June 1581) when the Barony was forfeited and granted to;
16. Esmé Stewart, 8th Earl and 1st Duke of Lennox (d. 1583), who was succeeded by his son;
17. Ludovic Stewart, 2nd Duke of Lennox, Duke of Richmond and Earl of Newcastle (d. 1624), who held the barony in 1585 when the forfeiture of the 4th Earl of Morton was reversed and the Barony was granted to the 4th Earl's nephew;
18. Archibald Douglas, 8th Earl of Angus (d. 1588), on whose death the barony devolved upon;
19. William Douglas, 5th Earl of Morton (d. 1606), who was succeeded by his grandson;
20. William Douglas, 6th Earl of Morton, who, on 13th September 1636, resigned the Barony to the King in favour of;
21. Thomas Ramsay of Edrington, who built Edrington House, was succeeded by his son in 1653;
22. Thomas Ramsay of Edrington, who sold the Barony in 1658 to;
23. James Douglas, 3rd Lord Mordington, from whom the Barony passed in 1685 to;
24. Joseph Douglas of Edrington, who was succeeded by his nephew in 1773;
25. Joseph Douglas Watson of Edrington, who sold the Barony in 1785 to;
26. William Marshall of Ingram and of Edrington, who was succeeded by his son in 1792;
27. Joseph Marshall of Edrington, who sold the Barony in 1834 to;
28. Anthony Dickson of Edrington, who was succeeded by his niece in 1856;
29. Mrs Dickson Milliken or Soady of Edrington, who was succeeded by her son in 1864;
30. Thomas Eales Soady of Edrington, who sold the Barony in 1864 to;
31. Henry Leck of Edrington, who sold the Barony in 1864 to;
32. George Chirnside of Edrington, who was succeeded by his trustees in 1898;
33. The Trustees of George Chirnside of Edrington, who sold the Barony in 1935 to;
34. Edrington & Co., who sold the Barony in 1939 to;
35. Munro Sutherland of Edrington, who sold the Barony in 1949 to;
36. Lindsay Clark Edwards of Edrington and his son Peter Lindsay Edwards of Edrington, who sold the Barony in 1962 to;
37. Janet Elspeth Robertson, Agnes Heatley Robertson and Ethel Greig Robertson, sisters, of Cawderstanes and Edrington, who sold the Barony in 1962 to;

The Robertson sisters, who founded the Robertson Trust, which owns the Edrington Group, which owns the 'Famous Grouse', 'Cutty Sark' and 'Highland Park' brands of whisky.

38. Hew Airth Grant of Edrington, who sold the Barony in 1963 to;
39. Janet Elspeth Robertson, Agnes Heatley Robertson and Ethel Greig Robertson, sisters, of Cawderstanes and Edrington, who sold the Barony in 1975 to;
40. Enid Ruth Thomson or Elphinston of Edrington, who sold the Barony in 1998 to;
41. Graham Senior-Milne (formerly Milne) of Edrington, 41st Baron of Mordington and his spouse, Annabel. Note that under the Abolition of Feudal Tenures (Scotland) Act 2000, feudal baronies ceased to be attached to the land and became incorporeal heritable property with effect from 28th November 2004. This means that from that date the Barony became a personal title.

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